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    Accessing Your Website Account

    Details

    To access your Dartmouth website account, the supported secure FTP (SFTP) clients are Fetch for MacIntosh OS X and SSH Secure Shell for Windows.

    Fetch is an FTP application that is site-licensed for Dartmouth. Originally developed at Dartmouth, this product is now sold by FetchSoftworks. If you are a member of the Dartmouth community, click the Fetch link below to download the site-licensed version of Fetch. Everyone else should click the FetchSoftworks link to purchase a copy of Fetch.

    Upgrade to Internet Explorer 11

    Details

    Microsoft ended support for Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10 on January 12, 2016.

    Mac OS X for Windows Users

    Details

    If you are using a Macintosh computer for the first time, the information below may help familiarize yourself with the new operating system.

    Aliases – the same as a shortcut in Windows.

    Command Key – same as the Windows key

    Dock – Similar to the “taskbar” in Windows. It appears, by default, at the bottom of your window and includes short cuts to applications. Applications that are running appear in the dock with a dot underneath them.

    Windows Defender with Microsoft Security Essentials for Windows 7

    Step-by-Step

    Windows Defender is Microsoft's built-in tool for detecting and removing malware from your computer.

    Windows Defender is installed as part of the operating system, and by default, is running on Windows 8 and 10. However, on Windows 7, you'll need to enable and configure it for use.

    Follow the steps below to set up Windows Defender on a computer running Windows 7:

    Media Storage and Sharing at Dartmouth

    Details

    Dartmouth offers a wide variety of digital media services for storing and sharing media with others. This article addresses how to request assistance selecting a media hosting solution. Key considerations for shared media include access control, copyright protection, and whether the data should be available for download or streamed. In addition, special attention should be given to whether any of the hosted data contains information protected by HIPAA, FERPA, or Dartmouth's Information Security Committee (DISC) policy.

    RStor - Central Data Storage for Researchers

    Details

    RStor is being phased out. It used to be Research Computing's main data storage offering and was available to anyone in the Dartmouth community.

    RStor is based on the OpenAFS distributed filesystem which provides secure network file storage at relatively low cost. RStor is frequently used to share files across the Internet because it has strong authentication and flexible access control. This can be especially useful to researchers when they either need off campus access themselves or the ability to share data with non-Dartmouth collaborators.

    Best Practices for Calendar Delegation

    Details

    A delegate is someone who would respond to ALL meeting invitations for your calendar. They do not have your calendar open all the time, but would receive all meeting invitations for you in their account. They can send and respond to meeting invitations for you as if they were you. An owner/editor is someone who is in your account all day and has full access to add and remove items from your calendar and accept or decline meeting invitations for your calendar, but they cannot send nor reply to meeting invitations as if they were you.

    Collaboration, File Sharing and Data Storage

    Details

    Dartmouth has a range of tools available for collaboration, file sharing and storage – each filling a unique need within the Dartmouth community. Some allow you to collaborate in real-time without storing the document in any different location; others allow you to store the document in a location where members of a group or team can access it when they need; others are for individual use only providing file storage that is available from any computer connected to the Internet, or file recovery needs.

    What Are EULAs and Why Should I Read Them?

    Details

    What is a EULA?

    An End User License Agreement (EULA) is a legal contract between a software application author or publisher and the user of that application. The EULA, often referred to as the "software license," is similar to a rental agreement. The user agrees to pay for the privilege of using the software, and promises the software author or publisher to comply with all restrictions stated in the EULA.

    Gene Construction Kit for Macintosh

    Step-by-Step

    Gene Construction Kit allows graphic manipulation of DNA sequences and plasmid drawing options.

    This application is KeyServed and requires KeyAccess be installed on your computer, as well as a connection to the Dartmouth network each time you run Gene Construction Kit.

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