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Can 'The Mandibles' Change Our Mind About the Future?

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses the book "The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047" by Lionel Shriver.

Read the full story, published on 7/26/16, in Inside Higher Ed.

Meet EMILY: The Remote-Controlled Buoy That May Serve as Your Next Lifeguard

Quotes Daniel Rockmore, the William H. Neukom 1964 Distinguished Professor of Computational Science and director of the Neukom Institute for Computational Science, in a news brief about how the Neukom Institute held a series of Turing tests that sought to determine if algorithms can produce "human-quality" works of art like sonnets, short stories and dance music sets.

Read the full story, published on 7/26/16 in Government Technology.

Does More Technology Bring Us Better Health Care?

Cites a book co-authored by Elliott Fisher, director of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and H. Gilbert Welch, professor of medicine, community and family medicine, and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, where they discuss how there are diminishing returns to many technological advances in healthcare.

Read the full story, published in the Huffington Post, on 7/25/16.

'Kill Process' Is a Techno/Crime/Startup/Spy Thriller

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses the book "Kill Process" by William Hertling.

Read the full story, published on 7/24/16, in Inside Higher Ed.

The Scope of edX

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses where the MOOC movement is going and shares stats to quantify the edX platform.

Read the full story, published on 7/22/16, in Inside Higher Ed.

What 'Paper' Says About Technological Change

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses the paper "Paper: Paging Through History" by Mark Kurlansky.

Read the full story, published on 7/20/16, in Inside Higher Ed.

CIO Explainer: What Is Artificial Intelligence?

An article that mentions that artificial intelligence (AI) has come a long way since the 1956 Dartmouth artificial intelligence conference, which many consider the birthplace of the discipline. The field has grown in fits and starts since then, partially due to a lack of computing power.

Read the full story, published on  7/18/16, in the Wall Street Journal.

Quest for Pokemon Is on in the Valley

An article that mentions Hanover has proven to be a hotbed of Pokemon activity for the smartphone app Pokemon Go, which uses GPS technology to scatter Pokemon throughout the real world to be "caught" by players who seek them out,  with "packs" of Dartmouth College students wandering downtown and throughout campus playing the game.

Read the full story, published on 7/15/16, in the Valley News.

Invisible Talent

An opinion piece by Kaya Thomas '17, creator of the iOS app We Read Too that encourages children to read books by and for people from underrepresented backgrounds, where she discusses a recent article about Facebook's diversity problem and how the tech industry needs to accept the blame for not hiring underrepresented people.

Read the full story, published on 7/14/16, in Medium.

Can This App Make Me Happier?

Quotes Darrin McMahon, professor of history, about how the idea that happy is something you should be, and can become through your own efforts, wasn't always as dominant as it is now. "I like to point out that the word for happiness in every Indo-European language is a cognate for luck," McMahon says. "In English, 'happy' comes from the Old Norse word 'happ'  meaning 'chance' or 'good luck'."

Read the full story, published on 7/13/16, in The Atlantic.

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