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Dartmouth Develops Device That Allows Football Players to Practice at Full contact Without Risk of Injury

Researchers at the Thayer School of Engineering have recently developed the "Mobile Virtual Player," a mobile device designed to replicate the size, weight, agility, and speed of a football player, that allows players to practice at full contact without the high risk of injury. The humanoid tackling dummy simulates in-game conditions while reducing athlete-on-athlete collisions. Buddy Teevens '79, the Robert L.

On Electronic Medical Records and My Path to Medicine

A blog post for the Association of American Medical Colleges Aspiring Doc Diaries by David Leander, Geisel '19, on his time providing on-the-job-training and troubleshooting support implementing Electronic Medical Records systems throughout the United States, and how the experience led him to pursue a medical degree.

Read the full story, published on 8/18/15 in Aspiring Doc Diaries.

Toward a Humanist Educational Technology?

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), asks readers what a humanist educational technology discipline look like, and what the leadership of an educational technology discipline would need to say or do to make it attractive to educators in the humanities.

Read the full story, published on 8/19/15 in Inside Higher Education.

Smart Light Lets You Control Your Environment

Quotes Xia Zhou, assistant professor of computer science and lead author of a paper on research that led to the production of a sensing system called LiSense, which uses light to sense people's movements and allows them to control devices in their environment with simple gestures, using light to transmit information. "Using purely visible light, we can not only stay connected to the internet, but also have the environment know and respond to what we do, how we behave, and how we feel," says Zhou.

Young Entrepreneurs Ready to Lead African Innovation Through Design

An opinion piece by Richard Nadworny '82, on how he taught 25 African entrepreneurs at Dartmouth College this past July as part of The Mandela Washington Fellows Program—the centerpiece of President Obama's Young African Leaders Initiative. Nadwordy notes that during their time at Dartmouth, the students focused on design, innovation and entrepreneurship. "The business ideas and pitches were astounding, to be honest. ...

What Higher Ed Jobs Will Robots Be Doing In 2025?

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses what jobs on college campuses could be performed by robots in 2025. "If we are going to improve our productivity in higher education then we must be open to look to automating those tasks that do not truly add value," says Kim.

Carly Fiorina's Record of Layoffs at HP Becomes a Campaign Issue

Quotes Howard Anderson, senior lecturer, who criticized of the merger of computer companies Hewlett Packard (HP) and Compaq under the leadership of Republican presidential nomination candidate Carly Fiorina. Anderson said in an interview that Fiorina's effort to turn around HP looks as bad in retrospect as it did at the time. "They both had fatal flaws," Anderson said of the two companies.

Amazon Only Perfected What American Work Culture Created

Quotes Sydney Finkelstein, the Steven Roth Professor of Management, in an article about the workplace culture of Amazon as portrayed by the New York Times. "Amazon is perfecting the American business model: working day and night. No meaningfulness. They're just better at it than most others," says Finkelstein.

Decoding Why the Amazon NYTimes Article Struck a Campus Nerve

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses reactions in higher education to a recent article about Amazon's workplace culture.

The Branding Logic Behind Google's Creation of Alphabet

An opinion piece by Kevin Lane Keller, the E. B. Osborn Professor of Marketing, on Google's recent introduction of a new parent brand, Alphabet. "Fundamentally, brands survive and thrive on their ability to deliver on a compelling brand promise—to provide superior delivery of desired benefits in ways that can't be matched by another other brand or firm," says Keller. "By aligning their brand architecture strategy with their brand promise and product development strategies, Google has brought needed clarity to the consumer marketplace and to financial markets."

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