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#BernieSoBlack in the Context of ''Confederate Flag Down, Rainbow Flag Up''

An opinion piece by Ayo Coly, associate professor of comparative literature and of African and African-American studies, discussing the trending hashtag #BernieSoBlack (which became popular in response to Sanders' unpreparedness to address questions asked by Black Lives Matter protesters on racial discrimination at a Netroots Nation Conference in July) within the framework of the slogan "Confederate Flag Down, Rainbow Flag Up."  "The hashtag instructs allies of Black Lives Matter not to subsume their race advocacy under such homogenizing and superficial rubrics as 'equality for all,'" says

Competition and Sharing in Learning Technology

In his recent post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL),  discusses how peer institutions can compete in the learning technology field, and also still collaborate on initiatives and projects.

Read the full story, published on 7/20/2015 in Inside Higher Ed

The 2000 Britannica Super Bowl Ad

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses the lessons that higher education can learn from the failure of the 2000 Super Bowl ad by Britannica. "The lesson for higher ed, I think, is that we should not let the digital revolution sway us from our core values and practices," says Kim.

Cybersecurity pros makes final push to quash proposed export restrictions

Mentions Sergey Bratus, research assistant professor of computer science and chief security advisor of Dartmouth's Institute for Security, Technology and Society (ISTS), and his suggestions made to the U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security in 2014 on how to implement the Wassenaar Arrangement.

Read the full story, published 7/17/2015 in The Christian Science Monitor

Searching, but Wanting to Explore

An opinion piece by Daniel Rockmore, the William H. Neukom 1964 Distinguished Professor of Computational Science and director of the Neukom Institute for Computational Science, on a recent study of Google search results by Tim Wu (of net neutrality fame) and others which found that the search giant might be skewing its search returns to favor certain businesses.

Read the full story, published on 7/17/2015 in The Huffington Post

Microsoft's Free Cloud Version of 'PhotoDNA' to Prevent Child Pornography

Mentions the collaboration between Dartmouth and Microsoft to develop the app PhotoDNA. Launched in 2009, the app has helped more than 70 companies like Facebook and Twitter identify illegal photos for removal. Microsoft will be rolling out a free cloud version of PhotoDNA that is easier for companies to set up and deploy, and will help law enforcement services and websites detect illegal images, including those depicting child sexual abuse from massive photo libraries.

Experimenting With Open Online Office Hours

In his latest post for Inside Higher Ed's "Technology and Learning" blog, Joshua Kim, director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning (DCAL), discusses Dartmouth's edX courses and the experimentation with the use of Google Hangouts On Air for open online office hours.

Read the full story, published on 7/16/2015 in Inside Higher Ed

You Need to Speak Up For Internet Security. Right Now.

Cites a suggestion by Sergey Bratus, research assistant professor of computer science and chief security advisor of Dartmouth’s Institute for Security, Technology and Society (ISTS), to adapt to the future and support the innovations that built the Internet, without stifling them by passing laws of noble intention but flawed implementation.

Transforming Everyday Life With Phone Apps

A decade ago, Professor of Computer Science Andrew Campbell could see that smartphone sensing applications were going to transform everyday life. Today, much of that transformation has taken place, and there is more to come, Campbell says.

Can Your Smartphone's Sensors Reveal if You're Depressed?

Quotes Ethan Berke, associate professor of community and family medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice at Geisel, on a recent study that found a smartphone's sensors could potentially identify whether the user might suffer from depression. "It's a very small study, and they didn't get data over a long period of time, but those things aside, it definitely advances our knowledge base," says Berke.

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